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Rick Davidson Will Join The Everest Group as a Principal and President
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Rick Davidson

Century 21 Real Estate LLC announced today that Rick Davidson will be transitioning from his role as president and CEO on April 21 to return to his entrepreneurial roots in real estate brokerage. Davidson will pursue his passion within the CENTURY 21 System as a principal and president of the Everest Group, operator of CENTURY 21 Everest-Troop Real Estate, a Salt Lake City-based firm with 17 offices in Utah and California. CENTURY 21 Everest-Troop ranks among the top five C21® franchise affiliates worldwide.

“We thank Rick Davidson for his 11 years of outstanding leadership and service at Realogy, the last seven of which have enabled CENTURY 21 to become a far stronger and healthier franchise network today than ever before,” said John Peyton, president and chief operating officer of the Realogy Franchise Group, the parent company of the CENTURY 21 System. “We are delighted that he will remain affiliated with the franchise system as he moves forward with this next stage of his career. There is no better validation for the C21® System than to have a leader of Rick’s caliber choose to affiliate with the franchise.”

Peyton continued, “In the interim, CENTURY 21 remains in extremely good hands with its existing senior leadership team, and the day-to-day operations of the brand will continue to be managed by Chief Operating Officer Greg Sexton. We are moving expediently, yet deliberately, to conduct a thorough search and evaluate candidates for the CEO position.”

During the past seven years, Davidson and his leadership team are credited with reinvigorating the CENTURY 21 System, putting in place a comprehensive plan to create excitement about the brand throughout the industry, drive brand pride, foster loyalty within the system and drive growth. The momentum behind CENTURY 21 today is powerful, as evidenced by the brand’s unprecedented sweep of the annual J.D. Power Home Buyer/Seller Satisfaction StudySM, in which it earned Highest Overall Satisfaction for First-Time Home Sellers, First-Time Home Buyers, Repeat Home Sellers, and Repeat Home Buyers (Tied in 2016) among National Full Service Real Estate Firms in each of the past three years.

“I am deeply proud of the growth and market positioning we have been able to accomplish together as a team at CENTURY 21,” said Davidson. “I cherish the relationships I have built through the years, and I am excited to become a principal of a leading franchise affiliate brokerage firm within the C21 System. This is the start of an exciting new chapter for my career, and my decision to remain affiliated with the CENTURY 21 brand should speak volumes about where my heart is. In my return to real estate brokerage, I wanted CENTURY 21 and the Realogy Franchise Group to remain my home.”

 

 

 

 

 

Real Estate Talk: California Needs 1.8 Million Homes to Meet Demand

by Marty Kovacs, Santa Clarita Valley Signal

California needs an additional 1.8 million new homes by 2025 to meet expected population growth, which means 180,000 new units must be built annually compared to the paltry pace of 80,000 homes per year seen for the last decade.

From 1955 to 1989 the state saw 200,000 units built annually so it definitely is possible.

With California’s desirable climate, diverse economy, and many of the nation’s top colleges, the state continues to experience strong housing demand, according to a draft statewide housing assessment released recently by the California Department of Housing and Community Development.

The report — California’s Housing Future: Challenges and Opportunities — notes, however, that housing construction is constrained by regulatory barriers, high costs, and fewer public resources.

In addition to the 100,000-unit shortfall per year in new construction, some of the housing challenges facing the state include:

  • Lack of supply and rising costs are compounding growing inequality and limiting advancement opportunities for younger Californians. Without intervention much of the housing growth is expected to overlap significantly with disadvantaged communities and areas with less job availability,
  • Continued sprawl will decrease affordability and quality of life while increasing transportation costs.
  • The majority of Californian renters — more than 3 million households — pay more than 30 percent of their income toward rent, and nearly one-third — more than 1.5 million households — pay more than 50% of their income toward rent.
  • Overall homeownership rates are at their lowest since the 1940s.
  • California is home to 12 percent of the nation’s population, but a disproportionate 22 percent of the nation’s homeless population.
  • For California’s vulnerable populations, discrimination and inadequate accommodations for people with disabilities are worsening housing cost and affordability challenges.

The report noted that potential actions on the cost of housing fall under three broad categories:

  • Reforming land use policies to advance affordability, sustainability, equity.
  • Addressing housing and access needs for vulnerable populations through greater inter-agency coordination, program design, and evaluation.
  • Investing in affordable home development and rehabilitation, rental and homeownership assistance, and community development.

“New home construction is unsustainably low,” said Ben Metcalf, director of the Dept. of Housing and Community Development. He was the keynote speaker at the recent  “Housing Our Workers” forum organized by the Southland Regional Association of Realtors, the Valley Economic Alliance, and BizFed Institute.

“It compounds today’s challenges, Metcalf said.” Over the coming weeks I’ll explore the concerns and recommendations that emerged from that forum and the state’s housing assessment report.

Marty Kovacs is the 2017 Chairman of the Santa Clarita Valley Division of the 9,500-member Southland Regional Association of Realtors. David Walker, of Walker Associates, co-authors articles for SRAR. The column represents SRAR’s views and not necessarily those of The Signal. The column contains general information about the real estate market and is not intended to replace advice from your Realtor or other realty related professionals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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